Room 14

Vicente Sebastián Pintado (1774 - 1829)

There's something both inviting and warm about the Vicente Sebastián Pintado room. Featuring a unique angled ceiling and a glimpse of the boats docked on the bay, this room also includes a king bed with all new linens, private bath with shower/tub, hair dryer, writing desk, dresser, flat screen TV, mini-fridge, complimentary WiFi, daily room service, and more.  Vicente Pintado, a career soldier, was appointed Surveyor General of West Florida in 1805 for the Spanish army, and is most famous for his “Pintado Plan.” This map outlined the streets of Pensacola, as well as the size and location of areas designated for the construction of public buildings. To this day, the Library of Congress maintains the Vicente Sebastian Pintado Papers. The collection consists of over 1,500 items, including “correspondence, bills of sale, court transcripts, testimonies, surveys, notebooks, plats, land grants, maps, petitions, and other papers relating to Pintado’s duties as alcalde, commandant, and surveyor general.” The collection has been crucial to our understanding of the ownership and sale of lands in Florida at the time. In 1817, Pintado was transferred to Havana, Cuba where he worked as a military engineer and lived with his wife, Eulalia Balderas until his death in 1829.